Pinterest Sewing Tip #2: Attaching Sleeves the Easy Way

I’ve challenged myself to begin working through the over 300 sewing techniques on my Pinterest board. The first technique listed is the one that I tried along with my pics.  If there are alternatives to the technique (from my board), they will follow. Each tutorial will include a Skill Level, Pinterest Link, and Direct Tutorial Link. Have you tried them before? If so, what did you think? Do you know a better way? Feel free to share.

When it comes to the final look and fit of a garment, quick is not always the best way to go. Sometimes, taking extra steps in a garment’s construction can make a huge difference in the quality of the finished product. This is not one of those times. When I first began sewing, I spent way too much time trying to figure out how to attach sleeves. It was burdensome. That’s why most of my earliest garments were sleeveless. I just didn’t get it. I’d sew up my sleeve seams, and then I’d pin, unpin and repin the finished sleeve  into the armscye, just to discover that something was “off” and I’d have to start all over again. Or, I’d pin the sleeves correctly, but just the plain awkwardness of sewing the small hole of a sleeve into a small armhole, I’d inadvertently suck up extra fabric from the sleeve into the seam. I hated my seam ripper.

Today’s Pinterest Sewing Tip is an “oldie but goodie”. You can find the technique demonstrated on multiple sites. I even found it in my 1987 Vogue Sewing for Children (Great book by the way). I pinned it on my board because it’s one of those time saving techniques that belongs in everyone’s grab bag.  I haven’t found an instance where this type of sleeve attachment wouldn’t be appropriate (there may be), but just in case, I’ve also provided some great alternatives below as well.

The technique in the above picture is from the superbly talented Dana from Dana Made It, but you can also find the same method from other equally talented seamstresses  here, and here.

Pinterest Link (Dana Made It)

Direct Link

Skill Level: Beginner

Pros: Super Easy

Cons: Ummm, I’ll let you know if I find one.:)

I whipped up some Thanksgiving tops for my girls using a super stretchy knit. I don’t sew with knits a lot, so I was concerned that my sleeves might turn out a bit wonky. I’m happy to say that my sleeves turned out beautifully using this technique. No extra puckering or “wonkiness” to be found :).

For a more traditional approach to sleeve setting, try these:

 

Pinterest Link

Direct Tutorial Link

Skill Level: Intermediate

Pinterest Link

Direct Tutorial Link

Skill Level: Advanced Beginner

 

As always, thanks for stopping by.

Keep doin’ what you love!

Shannon

 

  • http://twitter.com/sewfearless Jodi

    This is such a fabulous method. Trying to do it the “Regular way” always makes me want to cry. :P

    • Shannon_CC

      Ha!Ha! Me too.

  • Tammia

    Yes. If I would have known about this method in high school it might prevented more extreme frustration. I saw it on a pattern once and I wondered why I hadn’t thought of it before! (I love your girls’ dresses…I have some knit…I just need to get to it…)

    • Shannon_CC

      I’m a late bloomer. This method has been around forever, but I only found out about it a year or so ago. No one ever asked why I only made sleeveless tops (Ha!Ha!)